Friday, May 31, 2013

Jason versus Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers

When you think about it, this sixth entry in the Halloween series was made 18 years ago. The SIXTH film. Four have been made since and the first film is about to celebrate its 35th anniversary. Talk about a legacy!

Six years ago, Michael Myers terrorized the town of Haddonfield, Illinois. He and his niece, Jamie Lloyd, have disappeared. Jamie was kidnapped by a bunch of evil druids who protect Michael Myers. And now, six years later, Jamie has escaped after giving birth to Michael's child. She runs to Haddonfield to get Dr. Loomis to help her again. Meanwhile, the family that adopted Laurie Strode is living in the Myers house and are being stalked by Myers. It's the curse of Thorn that Michael is possessed by that makes him kill his family. And it's up to Tommy Doyle, the boy from Halloween, and Dr. Loomis, to stop them all.  

Any of that make sense? Not really? Don't worry, there's enough plot holes and abandoned story threads in this flick to fill 35 years worth of movies. You can blame Dimension Films for that, as the studio re-shot a good 40 minutes of this flick after test audiences didn't get the original cut.

Pussies.

What's here is a guilty pleasure at best. The Curse of Michael Myers doesn't make a lot of sense, but it's pretty to look at and has a number of great set pieces, not the least of which is the final throwdown in Smith's Grove Sanitarium.

I also dug the whole sequence where Kara Strode chases her son Danny into the Myers house, and Michael is waiting for them inside. Marianne Hagen = yum. There, I said it.

Oh, and nice score Alan Howarth! I appreciate the use of John Carpenter's original themes and sound effects. Very effective.

Still, when all is said and done, this is a shit film. But it's a shit film I enjoy watching over and over. Maybe it's because I'm a Halloween completest. Or maybe it's because I can appreciate mindless entertainment over beers on a Friday night.

A Good from me. Wanna fight about it?
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Jason and Shawn versus Chilling Visions: 5 Senses of Fear

Chilling Visions: 5 Senses of Fear

Jason: This is a great horror anthology that starts out somewhat light and ends with a bang. And everything in between is enjoyable too. What works in 5 Senses of Fear's favour is no matter how dark it gets -- and some of the material gets pretty dark -- it's still a lot of fun. The stories remind me of the old EC Vault of Horror and Tales from the Darkside comics. Gruesome yet not too heavy. This is horror the way horror is supposed to be – entertaining! My favourite story is Touch but, unlike most anthologies, there's no weak entry in the mix. All you Basementites who have access to the Chiller network need to tune in tonight or catch 5 Senses of Fear on rerun. You won't be disappointed. A Good from me.

Shawn: I've probably never said this before, I REALLY despise "mini-story" movies. Really. When I discovered that this was comprised of five of them, I lost interest. Until I watched it. I would have never gone out of my way to watch this if it wasn't something I had to watch for our show. Thank Jebus for our show. There are so many diamonds in the rough. This one is no exception. Every story was fantastically told in a super short amount of time, and the gore goods where delivered when needed. Zero cheese. Really. I liked every aspect of every flick. Really would watch this again. And shark chick -- hot! A Good.
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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Chilling Visions: 5 Senses of Fear

Get set for a Sense-ational Podcast Chiller, a little break from the normal summer schedule for something groovy.

Writer/director Nick Everhart made the bad ass short flick Slash-in-the-Box, which the Basement Boys featured right here. Now Nick is one of the contributors to the Chiller network's horror anthology Chilling Visions: 5 Senses of Fear, which premieres tomorrow night (Friday, May 31) at 9 p.m. eastern. Jason and Shawn have seen it, and it's time for the Basementites to share their thoughts.

The boys have gone done put together a podcast outside the five summer specials to do just that. What's it about? Six directors provide five unique -- and hair raising -- visions based on the human senses of touch, taste, sight, smell and sound.

So set your alarm clock for tomorrow at 8 a.m. pacific as The Basement's Sense-ational Podcast Chiller goes live, and Chilling Visions: 5 Senses of Fear is placed on the chopping block.

Stick with us!

Now for a look at our main attraction.



Source: Chiller

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Machete Kills in this international preview

Yeah, it's in Spanish. But this slick little preview does provide a first look at Robert Rodriguez's sequel to 2010's Machete.

From the footage here, if you dug Machete, you'll likely dig Machete Kills. For sure there's gonna be over-the-top violence, black comedy and a bevy of hotties like Amber Heard, Jessica Alba, Michelle Rodriguez, and Sofia Vergara. Plus there's Mel Gibson, Antonio Banderas and Charlie Sheen as the President of the United States.

Some scary looking mofo named Danny Trejo is in it too.

Here's the preview:



The U.S. government recruits Machete to battle his way through Mexico in order to take down an arms dealer who looks to launch a weapon into space.

Machete Kills hits theatres Sept. 13.

Source: JoBlo.com
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Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Blood Runs Cold this July

Check this off as something we're curious to scope out in The Basement. The micro-budgeted Swedish slasher flick Blood Runs Cold has made the VOD rounds here in North America, and now the Sonny Laguna directed flick is ready to hit the home market.

Gaiam Vivendi Entertainment and The Collective release Blood Runs Cold on DVD July 2. 

As for the story, Winona is a successful artist looking to get away from her stressful life. Her manager rents her a house in her home town where she runs in to an old boyfriend. They go back to the house, only to find out it's not as empty as they assumed. 

Betcha some people get killed. Betcha, betcha!

Blood Runs Cold stars Hanna Oldenburg, Patrick Saxe, Andreas Rylander, and Elin Hugoson. And yes, it does sound a little like the Norwegian movie Cold Prey. Still, I'm up for almost anything in the genre -- especially when it's made for just $5,000 US and looks pretty slick -- so don't be surprised to see a review pop up some time in July.

Here's a preview, for your eye holes!



Source: Arrow in the Head
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Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Community star will Beware the Night

No, we're not talking about Alison Brie or Gillian Jacobs -- although wouldn't that be grand -- but the series' douchebag-turned-not-such-a-douchebag Joel McHale.

McHale takes a giant step away from his comedic roots to play a cop in the Scott Derrickson directed paranormal thriller Beware the Night. Derrickson, hot off his success with Sinister, has amassed quite a cast too including Eric Bana, Olivia Munn, Sean Harris and Edgar Ramirez.

What's it about you ask? A New York cop (Bana) who has put his faith behind him finds himself target by the Devil. McHale plays his partner and Munn stars and Bana's wife.

Sinister was great, and I dug Derrickson's premiere effort The Exorcism of Emily Rose too. Here's hoping he gets a hat trick with Beware the Night.

King of Boom Jerry Bruckheimer produces. And I should point out that McHale is effing funny on Community.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter
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Monday, May 27, 2013

Jason's Top 5 non-comic book superhero movies

And by non-comic book I mean not based on a comic book, yet still clearly a film inspired by the four-colour world many of us Basementites grew up reading. These are flicks that embody the spirit of the superhero genre, but are original works by the filmmakers.

5) Sky High

More of a kids' flick to be sure, but still a surprisingly fun time at the movies. Kurt Russell, Bruce Campbell and Mary Elizabeth Winstead all own in this film, and director Mike Mitchell keeps things light, breezy and with the right balance of satire and respect for the genre. It's a lot like The Incredibles, only not quite as good.

4) Darkman

Believe it or not, this flick was my first introduction to the mad genius of Sam Raimi. It also, for a time, was my favourite movie of all time. Crazy, campy and ultraviolent, Darkman IS a comic book brought to brilliant life. And it made Liam Neeson a bad ass long before Taken came along. If you haven't seen it, get on it. There's enough wild action in this movie to fill a dozen or so like-minded films.

3) The Incredibles

Everyone -- well almost everyone -- loves The Incredibles. It's probably Pixar's finest couple of hours and is truly an ode to the comic-book hero. And bad guys die in it. That's rad for a kids cartoon! Good on Brad Bird for making such a fine piece of animation, and what a cast of voice actors. Craig T Nelson, Samuel L. Jackson, Holly Hunter  and Jason Lee. 'Nuff said.  

2) Robocop

A true superhero if ever there was one, only more of The Dark Knight Returns variety than anything else. Loud, violent, bloody and razor sharp, this is a brilliant turn on the comic-book hero. Plus it stars Peter Weller and Kurtwood Smith, who created one of the best bad guys every to grace the big screen. A must watch a couple of times a year.

1) Unbreakable

Made when M. Night Shyamalan was still the man. One of the coolest things about the writer/director's follow-up to The Sixth Sense is it takes almost the entire running time to figure out it's a superhero's origin story. And it's one of the most believable superhero stories ever told. Bruce Willis has rarely been better, the action scenes are solid and there's some great suspense. A class act all the way.
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